Glee, Twitter, and the Future of Television

Transmedia storytelling is the method of conveying a narrative across multiple media platforms simultaneously and harmoniously. This technique was pioneered in the 70’s and 80’s, but increased as the internet became more mainstream (Wikipedia). A modern example of this is the television series Glee. The programming encourages it’s viewers to participate with the show through social media. Mobile games have even been created for further engagement in various series.

I have experienced some of this growing transmedia storytelling trend. Whenever Manchester United, my favorite English soccer team, has a match I am unable to view through a live broadcast I can follow the game’s “hashtag” on Twitter. This allows me to see what people are saying about the most recent action along with photos and videos others post.

This sort of viewer engagement encourages loyalty and involvement in the “live” action of the programming. As a broadcaster, this strategy would be a no-brainer.

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Mass Communication Trends

My mass communication consumption and habits are fairly consistent with that of a high school teeny bopper. Although I don’t frequent Snapchat and rarely “reshare” meaningless content, I am addicted to LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook. I visit those mass communication platforms more regularly than a person probably ought to for personal leisure. I enjoy the platform provided by Vimeo and YouTube, but I don’t utilize them as frequently as I feel I should to disseminate my own content.

Mass communication has changed the very way I interact in everyday life. I used to exclusively be a consumer of media. Over the past few years, nearly every mass communication platform has evolved to allow end users to become greater contributors and not just consumers. This is something I’ve enjoyed in my personal use of those advancements.

I’m studying communication for my undergraduate degree. mass communication is a part of the essential classes I need to take. However, I’m not just trapped in this course. Understanding communication on all levels is something I enjoy pursuing. I’m a middle manager at a small disaster restoration company and have my own small photo booth company on the side. Both of which allow me to practice/improve my array of communication skills, including the use of mass communication platforms.

Update June 28, 2014 8:20PM: After reading a peer’s post on this topic, I had a response that I thought would be worth sharing here.

Having too much information at our finger tips and becoming distracted is a very real struggle. Even as I type this, I’m getting notifications left and right tempting me to respond. It reminds me of a video I was recently shown.

Is this “overload” of information at such an extreme that it is literally damaging to humanity? Or is this possibly just another phase of the evolutionary cycle that we have yet to come to terms with? Think about it, we say now that there was once a time when you had to actually pick up the phone to get in touch with a friend or family member. People of that generation abhor our generations quick messaging and check ins. But go back even further and you might find a time when people would be disgusted with the “ease” of just picking up a phone. They might say, “Back in my day, if I wanted to speak with Odysseus, I had to procure a ship that could travel across the great sea and then travel the 400 miles inland by foot.” Was the invention of the phone such a bad thing to have happen? Maybe our current method of communication and mass communication will be looked at as inconvenient 50 years from now when our clones and sending holographic messages to us through telepathy.

Getting on the Road to Excellence

My good friend, and coworker, hit things off very early on in our relationship. We met when I was hired by the company for whom he had already been working. The short end of the story is that as we grew together in the professional arena, we also grew as friends.

Several months ago we discussed that we wanted to eventually work together at our own company. We have seen countless examples of mediocrity in the workplace, both at the employee and ownership levels. Our aspiration is to strive to be excellent in our professional and personal lives. But we don’t want to stop there. We want to encourage and help others strive for excellence.

We wondered how we might be able to start collecting examples of excellence now while we are still young in our endeavor. Our agreement was to find a place where we could collaboratively document and share these examples.

We found such an opportunity through an emerging social media platform. Flipboard would allow us to curate a magazine where we could collaboratively collect and share inspiring articles relative to our joint venture.

We’ve just gotten a start at this, but here is a link to what we have so far: Excellence Is Not Optional. Go ahead and check it out! Your feedback is more than welcome.

What are you doing to be excellent? Share with me and I might just add your experience to our magazine!

Getting More Out Of Education

Everyone can study through any sort of text and learn the principles it is trying to teach. But how many of us can read through a text book just once and then go out and apply in real life what we’ve attempted to learn? I’d argue that you’d be hard pressed to find people who are that good at translating textbook materials into real life practices without serious direction.

What if you were given that focus before you began reading? What implication does that make? My thought is that you’d gain a more practical application to the material you’re attempting to learn. You’ll find greater depth of understanding through creating immediate application with the material as you read.

Free eBook | Four Steps to Creating Content for a Social Media Community

An example of this is when I was reading through a free eBook (Four Steps to Creating Content for a Social Media Community) offered by Radian6. The eBook gives great advice about creating and managing a longterm social media strategy for your organization. As I read, I discovered that I was more engaged in the reading as I applied what I was learning to my own social media community. The principles of each section became firmly planted in my mind.

I believe the more you allow yourself to engage in your studies, whatever they may be, you’ll find great understanding and success as you immerse yourself in immediate application.

What strategies have you learned that improve you mastery of a subject?

 

Which Will You Use? [Infographic]

– #31 –

I think it’s safe to say that with the rise of social media platforms one of the biggest questions on every corporation’s mind is how they should use social media which platform will they use?

According to Howmanyarethere?, notable social media platforms number beyond 200 websites. With such option and variety, how will companies be able to decipher which of these myriad networking sites will best suit their needs?

Whether an industry is better suited for the resources offered by Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or some other site is a question for a company’s communication team to wrestle with.

This infographic provided by mediabistro.com might serve you well if you find yourself on that communication team: